A Room Full Of Killers by Michael Wood #BookReview @MichaelHWood @KillerReads

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Book description

Feared by the people of Sheffield, Starling House is home to some of Britain’s deadliest teenagers, still too young for prison. Now the building’s latest arrival, Ryan Asher, has been found brutally murdered – stabbed twelve times, left in a pool of blood.

When DCI Matilda Darke and her team investigate, they uncover the secrets of a house tainted by evil. Kate Moloney, the prison’s manager, is falling apart, the security system has been sabotaged, and neither the staff nor the inmates can be trusted.

There’s only one person Matilda believes is innocent, and he’s facing prison for the rest of his life. With time running out, she must solve the unsolvable to save a young man from his fate. And find a murderer in a house full of killers…

img_1258A Room Full Of Killers is the third book in the DCI Matilda Darke series and in my opinion Michael Wood’s writing goes from strength to strength with each book he writes. It may sound cliched but it’s definitely the best book to date in the series, it’s much darker and definitely more disturbing than his previous books. The first thing I must mention about this book is that at times it makes for an disconcerting and uncomfortable read, so be warned! Although fairly graphic at times it is in keeping with the plot, and certainly makes for a frighteningly plausible read.

Starling House is home to some of Britain’s most dangerous teenagers, when a young boy is found murdered it’s up to DCI Matilda Darke and her team to find a murderer in a house full of killers. Matilda is fast becoming one of my favourite fictional detectives in A Room Full Of Killers Matilda is very much haunted by a cold case where the mistakes she made in the investigation led to a young boy never being found. Without going into spoilers this leads her to making unwise decisions that put members of her team in serious danger and her career at risk. The complexity of Matilda’s character add an edge to the plot, as you are never quite sure what she’s going to do next. Michael Wood also expands on the characters in Matilda’s team and the dialogue between them makes for light relief in this very dark tale.

Personally I found the Chapters told from the boys POV made for a spine chilling read as it vividly describes the events that led up to them being incarcerated in Starling House, each boys story sadly makes for a credible read in today’s climate. Their reasoning behind committing such shocking and deplorable crimes made my blood run cold. The graphic descriptions of violent events in the boys past add authenticity to the plot. This book could have just been another average crime thriller, but for me this book has depth due to the subject matter. It begs the question what turns a child into a killer? background? upbringing? It certainly gave me food for thought.

Thanks to the authors descriptive writing Starling House very much comes alive, so much so I had nightmares about it, I kid you not! This is a building steeped in malevolence, it’s bleak, claustrophobic and chilling to say the least, there’s a permanent sense of foreboding that never lets up. Fill a building with killer teenagers and it’s the stuff of nightmares, but highly original at the same time, which made this very much a “heart in your mouth” read. Michael wood very cunningly delivers a troubled and tangled tale which literally had me shaking my head as I tried to get one step ahead, fortunately the author never reveals too much so I found myself constantly on edge. Uncomfortable, shocking, and totally compelling, I would highly recommend you put this one to the top of your to read pile.

Print Length: 373 pages

Publisher: Killer Reads (17 Feb. 2017)

Amazon UK 🇬🇧

Or you can find all three books in the series here………. Amazon UK 🇬🇧

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2 thoughts on “A Room Full Of Killers by Michael Wood #BookReview @MichaelHWood @KillerReads

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