Category Archives: Caimh McDonnell

**Blog Tour** The Day That Never Comes by CaimhMcDonnell @camih @McFori_Ink

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Today I’m thrilled to be taking part in The Day That Never Comes blog tour, the latest in The Dublin Trilogy by Caimh McDonnell. If you fancy a bit of humour with your crime thriller then this might be just the book for you. The Day That Never Comes was published on 23 January 2017 by McFori Ink, so you don’t even have to wait to get your hands on a copy. I have a fabulous guest post on researching crime from Caimh McDonell it certainly made me chuckle.

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Knowing the Unknowable by Caimh McDonnell

Research is a bit like driving; when it is done well, you don’t really notice it but done badly, and you have to resist the urge to open the window and scream “what the hell are you doing?!”

The internet is very much a mixed blessing for authors – we can find out almost anything if we look in the right places, but so too can the curious reader. It has never been easier to get something right or to be proven wrong. Back in the old days, Charles Dickens could get away with ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times’ because nobody was able to tweet him back with statistics that proved it was in fact neither.

Research is of course vital but it is a real ‘how long is a piece of string’ type deal and if you’re not careful, you’ll end up tied in knots. You’ve got to set yourself a time limit otherwise you can disappear down an internet rabbit-hole and not be seen for days. I lost a large chunk of a week watching videos of numerous guys from America’s Deep South, who in my memory were all called Bubba, doing video reviews of guns on YouTube. There is something hypnotically disturbing about a big bearded mountain man who looks like he washes himself in the creek once a month, lovingly stroking a handgun while describing it as ‘the gun God would use.’

Then of course there is the issue of internet search history paranoia. Ask any crime author and they’ll tell you; we have to google a lot of weird stuff. Not that long ago, I spent quite a while trying to figure out what it would be like if, in the course of a fight, you had to bite someone. It is a creepy thing to google and asking questions on Facebook got very mixed results. Using social media as a source probably does work well for most people, but when 90% of your Facebook friends are professional stand-up comedians, you have to be very wary of the attempt to try and make you look silly in print.

My paranoia regarding my digital footprint is considerably greater than most authors and I think with some justification. I’m an Irishman living in England; certain things are red flags. I’ve had to do research on explosives for my books, that is not something you want sitting in your favorites when you’ve got my passport. I did consider going to an internet café – yes, in the age of everyone having internet on their phone, those places inexplicably still exist – but I rejected the idea. Going to an internet café to research explosives is exactly what a terrorist would do. Come to think of it, it is hard to think of anything legal that people need to go to an internet café to research. If MI5 haven’t done so already, they should set up their own chain of internet cafés.

My solution to my explosive problem was to text a friend of mine, let’s call him A. A is still technically a British policeman, although he’s on sabbatical doing comedy for the last few years. Here is a dramatic recreation of our text conversation:

C: “Hi fella, I hope you’re well. Just wanted to let you know that I’m googling stuff about bombs as research for my book.”
A: “OK. Why are you telling me this?”
C: “I don’t want to get arrested.”
A: “Relax. We don’t arrest people for just reading about stuff like that.”
C: “Anymore – you forgot to say ‘anymore’ there.”
A: “Touché.”

Next day.

C: “How long does it take a body to smell?”
A: “Shower once a day and you’ll be alright.”

C: “From how far away could you shoot somebody in the head?”
A: “Don’t tempt me.”

He’s actually has been very useful, I just hope I haven’t annoyed him enough that he’ll refuse to appear as a character witness. Regardless, you’ve read this. Remember this post if you see my face on the Six O’Clock News. I don’t want to end up sharing a cell with one of the Bubbas, lovesick for his gun collection.

Book description

Remember those people that destroyed the economy and then cruised off on their yachts? Well guess what – someone is killing them.

Dublin is in the middle of a heat wave and tempers are running high. The Celtic Tiger is well and truly dead, activists have taken over the headquarters of a failed bank, the trial of three unscrupulous property developers teeters on the brink of collapse, and in the midst of all this, along comes a mysterious organisation hell-bent on exacting bloody vengeance in the name of the little guy.

Paul Mulchrone doesn’t care about any of this; he has problems of his own. His newly established detective agency is about to be DOA. One of his partners won’t talk to him for very good reasons and the other has seemingly disappeared off the face of the earth for no reason at all. Can he hold it together long enough to figure out what Bunny McGarry’s colourful past has to do with his present absence?

When the law and justice no longer mean the same thing, on which side will you stand?

The Day That Never Comes is the second book in Caimh McDonnell’s Dublin trilogy, which melds fast-paced action with a distinctly Irish acerbic wit.

Published 23 January 2017

McFori Ink

340 pages

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Amazon UK 🇬🇧         Amazon US 🇺🇸

If you haven’t read the A Man with One of Those Faces what are you waiting for?

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Amazon UK 🇬🇧         Amazon US 🇺🇸

img_1259Caimh McDonnell is an award-winning stand-up comedian, author and writer of televisual treats. Born in Limerick and raised in Dublin, he has taken the hop across the water and now calls Manchester his home.

His writing credits include The Sarah Millican Television Programme, A League of Their Own, Mock the Week and Have I Got News for You. He also works as a children’s TV writer and was BAFTA nominated for the animated series ‘Pet Squad’ which he created. He was also a winner in the BBC’s Northern Laffs sitcom writing competition.

During his time on the British stand-up circuit, Caimh has firmly established himself as the white-haired Irishman whose name nobody can pronounce. He has brought the funny worldwide, doing stand-up tours of the Far East, the Middle East and Near East (Norwich).

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Links: Website        Facebook        Twitter: @caimh

If you’ve missed posts from this blog tour and would like to read reviews, extracts of the book I’ve included the blog tour banner below.

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**Guest Post** by Caimh McDonnell Author of A Man With One Of Those Faces

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Today I have an guest post from Caimh McDonnell author of A Man With One Of Those Faces, an intriguing title for a book don’t you think? A Man With One of Those Faces is a fast-paced crime thriller set in the authors home town of Dublin in case you were wondering. This is a guest post with a difference, Caimh gives us the low down on dog detectives, yes you read that right, and a very interesting post it is too.

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Dog Detectives

“Up next in the Mastermind chair is author Caimh McDonnell.”
“Great to be here Magnus.”
“Magnus Magnusson, the original host of Mastermind, died almost ten years ago.”
“Ehm… pass.”
“What is your specialist subject?”
“Buddy cop films in which one of the cops is a dog.”
“Isn’t that only about five films?”
“Four. I refuse to acknowledge the horrendous Chuck Norris vehicle Top Dog.”
“You’re an idiot.”
“Yes Magnus but I’ve started so I’ll finish.”

Don’t get me wrong, Forrest Gump was a delight and Philadelphia a triumph but hand on heart, I would’ve given Tom Hanks the Oscar for his role in the 1989 classic Turner and Hooch. To be fair, in pure acting terms, it isn’t his best work but seeing as there is criminally no Oscar category that acknowledges outstanding animal performances, I’d give it to him by association.

We all have our guilty pleasures, mine is a love of buddy cop films featuring dogs. They had some serious box office mojo for about six months at the end of the 80s, but what a six months it was! Something about it just works. I think it taps into our inherent affection for man and woman’s best friend. At the time, I made the case that Lethal Weapon would’ve been much improved as a film if Mel Gibson had been replaced with a troubled Yorkshire Terrier, I believe history has proven me right.

As a species, humanity is almost pre-programmed to trust dogs. They are perceived as loyal animals that will protect the family. Nobody would consider a guard cat. There has never been a story of a pet snake travelling halfway across the country to be reunited with its owners and dolphins have never knowingly brought down an international drug-smuggling cartel. Even when we meet a bad canine, we place the blame firmly on the humans who haven’t trained or treated it right. Dogs are great; people on the other hand, are often a disappointment.

This is why the role of maverick cop who breaks the rules but gets results is so perfectly filled by a dog. As an audience, we are much more willing to forgive Hooch, the Bordeaux Mastiff (the tour-de-force and only-ever cinematic performance by Beasley the dog) when he relieves himself in the office. While it wouldn’t be the worst thing he has done, Bruce Willis can not pull that off with anywhere near the same degree of lovable charm.

Sadly though, while much that was bad about the 80s – Cold War tension, shoulder pads and synth pop – has enjoyed a revival, the doggy detective genre hasn’t. It was with this in mind that I set myself the challenge of trying to write a short story featuring a canine hero. My debut novel, A Man With One of Those Faces features a police officer called DS Bunny McGarry, who is my take on the loner cop trope. He is a foul-mouthed maverick with a penchant for violence albeit one with a distinctively Irish twist. I decided to twist convention by placing a maverick with a maverick. The short story Dog Day Afternoon is the result. If you’d like to read it visit www.WhiteHairedIrishman.com/free/ and you’ll receive it as part of a free collection of short stories called How to Send a Message.

The film rights are still available. Brendan Gleeson and a German Shepherd take on organised crime on the mean streets of Dublin, who doesn’t want to see that film?

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About the Author

Caimh McDonnell is an award-winning stand-up comedian, author and writer of televisual treats.

His writing credits include The Sarah Millican Television Programme, A League of Their Own, Mock the Week and Have I Got News for You. He also works as a children’s TV writer and was BAFTA nominated for the animated series ‘Pet Squad’ which he created. He was also a winner in the BBC’s Northern Laffs sitcom writing competition.

During his time on the British stand-up circuit, Caimh has firmly established himself as the white-haired Irishman whose name nobody can pronounce. He has brought the funny worldwide, doing stand-up tours of the Far East, the Middle East and Near East (Norwich).

His debut novel, A Man with One of Those Faces, a darkly comic crime thriller set in Dublin, is out now.

Website     Twitter:@caimh

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Book description

The first time somebody tried to kill him was an accident.
The second time was deliberate.
Now Paul Mulchrone finds himself on the run with nobody to turn to except a nurse who has read one-too-many crime novels and a renegade copper with a penchant for violence. Together they must solve one of the most notorious crimes in Irish history . . .
. . . or else they’ll be history.

Amazon UK     Amazon US