A Mind To Kill by John Nicholl #BookReview @Nicholl06

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Book description

They kill innocence. She wants revenge.

When Rebecca’s childhood abuser escapes justice it sets her on a path to revenge. Revenge on any man who preys on the innocent.

A gripping page-turner of a psychological thriller packed with suspense.

IMG_2357John Nicholl isn’t afraid to write stories that challenge and shock, he pushes the boundaries of what we expect, if anything A Mind To Kill is his most shocking and disturbing book yet. This book deals with a very tough subject child abuse, and for that reason I’m not sure this book will be to everyone’s taste, it’s definitely not one for the faint-hearted as they are some pretty detailed scenes that are grim and very violent. Rebecca’s childhood is left in shatters when her abuser escapes justice. Fast forward seventeen years and Rebecca wants her revenge what follows is a dark and very disturbing tale.

A Mind To Kill is a book about vengeance and getting revenge on the worse kind of people, that commit the most abhorrent crimes. It’s very clear from John Nicholl’s writing that he is extremely knowledgeable in both police matters and child abuse, so although A Mind To Kill makes for a grim read, it also unfortunately makes for a very credible one in parts. The author gives an ugly insight into the minds of the predators who carry out the most heinous crimes, as a reader you can only hope these men get “their just deserts”. At times I did feel the plot was a little to far fetched to be realistic, but it’s a fiction book at the end of the day.

There’s is a very dark psychological thriller there no doubt about that, but it’s also fraught with tension and the sense of evil radiating from the pages is palatable. A Mind To Kill shows that nothing is black and white, sometimes the lines between become blurred, what happens when the justice system fails the very people it’s there to protect? Is it ever acceptable for someone to take the law into their own hands to seek justice? these were questions I found myself thinking about as I read A Mind To Kill, it’s a controversial story that I’m sure will raise many a debate amongst it’s readers. This novel is definitely not going to be to everyone’s taste It’s shocking and makes for a disconcerting read, so would I recommend it? Yes but only to those with a strong disposition.

Buying links: Amazon Uk 🇬🇧Amazon US 🇺🇸

 

 

In Your Name by Rob Ashman #BookReview @RobAshmanAuthor @bloodhoundbook

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Book description

A chilling serial killer thriller from The Mechanic trilogy

Police detective Lucas has become consumed with tracking down the deranged killer, known as Mechanic, and bringing the murderer to justice. Nothing else matters, not even his wife. His marriage is falling apart.
Mechanic has not killed for eight months and the trail has gone cold, then Lucas receives a terrifying letter. In a desperate bid to reignite the case, he tries to convince his boss to mount an operation in Baton Rouge where the letter was posted.

But was the letter really sent by Mechanic?

Not knowing where to turn, with his marriage in turmoil and his career on the rocks, Lucas begins to spiral out of control and when Mechanic meets the head of a drug smuggling cartel the situation takes a grave turn.
Meanwhile, a bizarre set of murders are taking place in Vegas and Detective Rebecca Moran is put on the case. She will stop at nothing to make a name for herself.

Is there a link between the murders and Mechanic?
Can Lucas apprehend the killer this time or will Mechanic remain one step ahead?

IMG_2357Now I don’t know about you, but when I pick up the next book in a series I do so with trepidation. I’m always concerned that the next book won’t live up to expectations. I actually loved Those That Remain by Rob Ashman, the first book in the Mechanic series and I would go as far as to say it’s one of my top reads of 2017, so unfortunately for the author I was expecting great things for In Your Name. I’m not going to keep you in suspense as far as I’m concerned Rob Ashman has only gone and done it again and written another dark and gripping addition??? to the Mechanic series. This is one crime series you don’t want to miss!

Detective Lucas’s every waking moment is consumed with catching the cold hearted and sadistic serial killer known as The Mechanic, even if it means putting his career and marriage in jeopardy. From the opening chapter where Lucas is stood over a grave, you get an immediate sense of foreboding and just know things are about to get a lot worse for Lucas as he tries to bring the mechanic to justice. Poor Lucas as if he didn’t suffer enough in the last book, he returns to his job a broken man in both body and spirit, but like the saying goes “you cant keep a good man down” Lucas is filled with rage and won’t rest until he catches Mechanic.

Just like the previous book Mechanic is one seriously twisted and cunning killer always managing to keep one step ahead of Lucas, taunting him at every opportunity. Rob Ashman has created a monster there’s no doubt about it, but the Mechanic is a complex characters and once again I did find myself having just a smidgin of sympathy for them especially when you know their back story. I’m so intrigued by Mechanic, they are one seriously sick and twisted individual, I was hoping this would be a long running series alas it looks like there is only going to be one more book in this highly compelling series.

I thought this series couldn’t get any better but I’m pleased to report I was wrong, if anything this book is darker, and definitely more gruesome, the pace is relentless so you don’t have time to catch your breath before the next big shock comes along. I should point out all though Rob Ashman is a British author this novel reads very much like it’s been written by an American, the settings are authentic and the scenes frighteningly disturbing just the way I like my crime thrillers. In Your Name is fast paced, brutal and addictive, each book leaves you desperately wanting more, luckily we don’t have to wait long as the third book in the Mechanic series Pay The Penance is out the beginning of August and I can’t wait!

I’m sure it will come as no surprise to hear I’m giving In Your Name the very prestigious Gold Star Award Rating. It’s given to a book I feel is particularly outstanding, a book that covers every aspect of what I look for in a fabulous read, fantastic plot, great characters and a storyline that draws me in from the first page and keeps me in its grips until I reach the very last page.

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Buying links: Amazon UK 🇬🇧 Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 290 pages

Publisher: Bloodhound Books (13 July 2017)

 

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You can read my review for Those That Remain here….Those That Remain

**Blog Tour** Dying To Live by Michael Stanley #GuestPost @detectivekuba @OrendaBooks

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I’m delighted to welcome you to my stop on the blog tour for Dying To Live by Micheal Stanley which is published by one of my favourite publishers Orenda Books. Peter James describes this book as ‘A wonderful, original voice – McCall Smith with a dark edge and even darker underbelly’ and the good news, Dying To Live was published on the 30th June 2017 so you don’t even have to wait to get your hands on a copy.

To celebrate I have a really fascinating guest Post from the authors about The Bushmen people of the Kalahari, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

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A Culture at Odds

The Bushmen people of the Kalahari are at the centre of the latest Detective Kubu mystery – Dying to Live. It’s a Bushman who is found dead at the start of the story. At first it seems to be a natural death, but then the police decide that, in fact, he was killed. The more they look into his death, the more confusing it becomes. His body seems young on the inside but old on the outside. There’s an ancient black-powder bullet lodged in his abdomen, but no entry scar. And then his body is stolen from the morgue.

The Bushmen have been nomadic for hundreds of thousands of years. As other population groups crowded them, they moved into the arid regions of southern Africa and developed a very successful, if Spartan, lifestyle. They would dig for water and suck it out of the ground through grass straws, or find fluid in Tsama melons. If they found natural water, they would always leave some for those who came after; sharing was a survival strategy. They moved with the seasons, following game which they hunted using bows and poisoned arrows. The poisons make a story in themselves, ranging from snake venom, through extraordinary desert plants, to an extraction from the larva of a beetle which is so poisonous there’s no known antidote.

Fast forward to the twenty-first century. (There’s some pretty sickening stuff in the years we’re skipping, including a period when governments issued licenses to hunt Bushmen.) Now much of the Kalahari is declared as the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. Diamond mining drives the Botswana economy. Bushmen numbers have declined, and in 1997, the Government of Botswana started to relocate the Bushman to a permanent settlement outside the game reserve. In 2005 they forced the last of the Bushmen to move.

How you interpret the situation depends on your perspective. Here’s a superficial summary of the way some of the Bushman leaders see it, and how support groups like Survival International see it:

The Bushmen have always lived in the Kalahari. Fences and private land ownership—which is alien to them—interferes with their nomadic behaviours, and rules concerning hunting force them near starvation. Their culture is disrespected and is being destroyed by the change in environment, and legal constraints in which they’ve had no say. In order to keep the Kalahari for tourism and—according to some—diamond mining, the Bushmen are being forced into settlements little better than concentration camps on the verges of the land they once regarded as their own. Yes, there is some compensation, but this is soon frittered away leaving nothing. Financial planning is completely outside their ken.

And here is how the Botswana government sees it:

The government has a constitutional obligation to provide appropriate infrastructure for all its citizens. This includes proper schools, health care, water and sanitation. Furthermore, the Kalahari is remote and inaccessible, an ecological treasure that must be preserved. Discrimination on race is forbidden by the constitution, so if the Bushmen live there, how are other population groups to be prevented from living and hunting there? And now the Bushmen hunt with guns rather than bows and arrows. Their nomadic behaviour has changed to informal settlements where water has to be supplied by the government by road, rather than found in natural depressions or melons. Crudely put, the traditional culture is already dead, only the inconvenience remains. Thus planned settlements set up in appropriate places with schools and services is the answer. Appropriate compensation is paid to the people who have to move. They have a new and better life ahead.

In the wide gap between these two viewpoints is a variety of groups who tried to negotiate a scenario which would bring the two sides closer together. Nevertheless, with such extreme perspectives, and the muscle behind each side, it was almost inevitable that the matter would end in the Botswana High Court. In 2006, the presiding judge of the Court was the remarkable Unity Dow—first woman High Court judge in Botswana, member of the Kenyan Constitutional Court, writer, and now minister of education. Broadly, the three judges ruled in favour of the Bushmen. In the judgement, Dow said that the case was ‘ultimately about a people demanding dignity and respect. It is a people saying in essence: “Our way of life may be different, but it is worthy of respect. We may be changing and getting closer to your way of life, but give us a chance to decide what we want to carry with us into the future”.’ When we met her on a trip to Gaborone some years later, we asked her whether she felt the issues had been resolved by the ‘the most expensive and longest-running trial’ Botswana has ever had. She just smiled sadly and shook her head.

While researching our book, we visited New Xade, the settlement established by the government to the west of the Kalahari game reserve a hundred kilometres from anywhere. It’s a depressing place, there is little being done there, and little to do. It’s even some way off the main road into the game reserve, itself a dirt track. People pass it by; there’s nothing there they want.

But in Dying to Live we suppose that there is something there that people find they want very much. Something that kept the dead old Bushman young.

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Michael Stanley is the writing team of Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip. Both were born in South Africa and have worked in academia and business. On a flying trip to Botswana, they watched a pack of hyenas hunt, kill, and devour a wildebeest, eating both flesh and bones. That gave them the premise for their first mystery, A Carrion Death, which introduced Detective ‘Kubu’ Bengu of the Botswana Criminal Investigation Department. It was a finalist for five awards, including the CWA Debut Dagger.

The series has been critically acclaimed, and their third book, Death of the Mantis, won the Barry Award and was a finalist for an Edgar award. Deadly Harvest was a finalist for an International Thriller Writers’ award, and book 5, A Death in the Family, was an international bestseller.

Author links: Website     Twitter     Facebook

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Book description

When the body of a Bushman is discovered near the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, the death is written off as an accident. But all is not as it seems. An autopsy reveals that, although he’s clearly very old, his internal organs are puzzlingly young. What’s more, an old bullet is lodged in one of his muscles … but where is the entry wound? When the body is stolen from the morgue and a local witch doctor is reported missing, Detective ‘Kubu’ Bengu gets involved. But did the witch doctor take the body to use as part of a ritual? Or was it the American anthropologist who’d befriended the old Bushman?

As Kubu and his brilliant young colleague, Detective Samantha Khama, follow the twisting trail through a confusion of rhino-horn smugglers, foreign gangsters and drugs manufacturers, the wider and more dangerous the case seems to grow. A fresh, new slice of ‘Sunshine Noir’, Dying to Live is a classic tale of greed, corruption and ruthless thuggery, set in one of the world’s most beautiful landscapes, and featuring one of crime fiction’s most endearing and humane heroes.

Buying Links:    Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

My thanks to Orenda Books, Michael Stanley for the fascinating guest post  and Anne Cater for organising another fabulous blog tour.

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Manipulated Lives by H.A. Leuschel #Bookreview @HALeuschel

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Book description

Five stories – Five Lives.

In this collection of short novellas, you meet people like you and me, intent on living happy lives, yet each of them, in one way or another, is caught up and damaged by a manipulative individual. First you meet Tess, whose past is haunted by a wrong decision, then young, successful and well balanced Sophie, who is drawn into the life of a little boy and his troubled father. Next, there is teenage Holly, who is intent on making a better life for herself, followed by a manipulator himself, trying to make sense of his irreversible incarceration. Lastly, there is Lisa, who has to face a parent’s biggest regret. All stories highlight to what extent abusive manipulation can distort lives and threaten our very feeling of self-worth.

There are five short stories:
The Narcissist
Tess and Tattoos
The Spell
Runaway Girl
My Perfect Child

img_1258Manipulated Lives is a very different read to my usual crime/thriller reads but never the less I was intrigued by the book description. Here’s the thing after spending years working in mental health I’ve always been intrigued by the human psyche and behaviour so the concept for Manipulated Lies fascinated me . What makes someone become a manipulator and more importantly how does someone find themselves caught up and damaged by a Manipulative individual?

In this collection of five short stories we meet the masters of manipulators, we also meet the victims ordinary people trying to lead normal life’s, there’s no specific gender, (although interestingly a high percentage of men are classed as manipulators) or age group, or characteristics that sets these victims apart. It literally could happen to anyone.

The five stories are all very different, each one gives a troubling insight into the workings of a manipulator, their ability to lack compassion and the devastating impact their behaviour has on their victims. Although each story is fairly short they certainly don’t lack depth, each one will stay with me for very different reasons. The Characters were an intriguing bunch and they were really well developed which took my by surprise as sometimes a short story doesn’t  give the author time to develop the characters.

The story that stands out for me is the third in the book The Spell, it features Sophie who unwittingly becomes entangled in the lives of a young boy and his father, both running from something or someone…it shows how a perfectly normal relationship between a couple can turn into something much darker and sinister. I’m not sure where or how but H A Leuschel manages to give such an incredible insight into the subject of manipulative behaviour, I couldn’t help but wonder was she writing from experience or has she researched the subject throughly?

Each story very much highlight the fact that anyone has the ability to be a manipulator, just like everyone has the potential to become a victim so Manipulative Lies not only made for a disconcerting read but a thought provoking one too. I’m not sure this book gave me all the answers I was looking for, but it certainly gave me a better understanding of the subject and made for a very compelling read.

Buying links: Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

Paperback: 272 pages

Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 1 edition (28 Jun. 2016)

 

**Blog Tour** Wolves In The Dark by Gunnar Staalesen @OrendaBooks #BookReview

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Today I’m hosting The Wolves In The Dark by Gunnar Staalesen blog tour,  which is published by the fantastic Orenda Books. I’m thrilled to be able to share my review for this gripping and very disturbing book. Many thanks to Karen Sullivan over at Orenda Books and Anne Cater for allowing me to be part of this awesome blog tour.

Book description

PI Varg Veum fights for his reputation, his freedom and his life, when child pornography is found on his computer and he is arrested and jailed. Worse still, his memory is a blank…
Reeling from the death of his great love, Karin, Varg Veum’s life has descended into a self-destructive spiral of alcohol, lust, grief and blackouts.
When traces of child pornography are found on his computer, he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring and thrown into a prison cell.

There, he struggles to sift through his past to work out who is responsible for planting the material… and who is seeking the ultimate revenge.
When a chance to escape presents itself, Varg finds himself on the run in his hometown of Bergen. With the clock ticking and the police on his tail, Varg takes on his hardest – and most personal – case yet.

Chilling, shocking and exceptionally gripping, Wolves in the Dark reaffirms Gunnar Staalesen as one of the world’s foremost thriller writers.

img_1258I thought I had made a huge blunder agreeing to review Wolves In The Dark, I didn’t realise it was the 21st book in the series, so I pretty much convinced myself that I would find this a difficult novel to read, I hate starting a series a couple of books in let alone 21! I always find it hard to connect with the characters. I’m thrilled to report that all my worries were unfounded and Wolves In The Dark made for a throughly gripping read and yes it can be read as a standalone.

Wolves in the Dark doesn’t ease you in gently to it’s plot from the first chapter where PI Varg Veum is arrested for having child pornography on his computer and he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring you know you are in for a dark and disturbing read. There’s no doubt about it Wolves In The Dark is not always an easy read, while it never felt gratuitous within the context of the story, I can see that this won’t be to everyone’s tastes due to the subject matter.

Varg is one complex character he’s a damaged soul, he much prefers to drown his sorrows in alcohol so he doesn’t have to deal with his grief, but despite the darkness surrounding him I also find something intriguing about this well established character. I do feel there is a lot of history to his character, history I’ve missed out on as I haven’t read previous books in the series, but overall I still managed to get a “feel” for this complex yet intriguing character.

As Varg looks back on past cases and the enemies he’s made looking to find answers to his current predicament, the pages of this cracking plot are fraught with suspense and you can’t help but wonder where the author is heading with this gritty yet compelling tale. I did find some parts confusing due to the number of characters involved in the plot and the numerous threads, but that said the author expertly manages to bring everything together masterfully.

After I finished Wolves In The Dark I’ve come to the conclusion that although I’ve come to this series late, it really did not spoil my enjoyment of this well written novel. I would like to think at some point I will go back and read early books in this series, but if I don’t get the chance it’s definitely a series I will read from here on in. Superbly paced with a disturbing plot Gunnar Staalesen has written an outstanding book in Nordic noir, it has so many elements that made this a gripping read. If you like your thrillers dark and gritty then this is definitely the book for you.

Buy links:   Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 276 pages

Publisher: ORENDA BOOKS (9 May 2017)

About the author

Granite Noir Fest 2017

Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife. When Prince Charles visited Bergen, Staalesen was appointed his official tour guide. There is a life-sized statue of Varg Veum in the centre of Bergen, and a host of Varg Veum memorabilia for sale. We Shall Inherit the Wind and Where Roses Never Die were both international bestsellers.

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Good Girl Gone by KT Finch #MiniReview

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Book description

One morning, everything changes…
A gripping novella with an awesome twist.
Tom Cheever is an IT specialist, a recovering alcoholic, and a single dad. Molly, his ten-year-old daughter is his whole life. But one ordinary morning, Tom discovers that Molly’s not in her room.
Gone. Vanished.

Police are called, a search party goes out, and Tom, already struggling with staying sober, finds himself coming undone. As hours become days without any sign of Molly, everyone she knows is called into question, including Tom himself.

As he tries to desperately piece together what could’ve happened, Tom realises that nothing is quite as it seems. Will Molly be found in time? Or will Tom have to face the rest of his life not knowing what happened to little girl?

img_1258I picked up Good Girl Gone by K T Finch as my interest was piqued by the book description, if I had looked a little more closely I would have realised it was a novella. Now I’m not normally a fan of short stories, I’m going to state the obvious here and admit I find them well short! I like to get a feel for the characters, which you often don’t get with a short story and they often feel rushed or the conclusion falls short, but never the less I decided to persevere.

Good Girl Gone starts off really well Ten year old Molly goes missing during the night and her recovering alcoholic father comes immediately under suspicion. The first half of this novella started off really well and I had high hopes for it, but unfortunately the second half let it down, it felt rushed and I pretty much guessed the ending so there were no big surprises or twists.

The author manages to pack a lot in, and there is some character development but not enough for me to invest in the characters. Although I was slightly disappointed with this short story, if it had been longer and the author had built on the suspense it could have been a really good read. I do like KT Finch style of writing and I would certainly be tempted to pick up full length novel by this author.

Buying links: Amazon UK 🇬🇧      Amazon US 🇺🇸
 

**Blog Tour** The Lighterman by Simon Michael #AuthorInterview @simonmichaeluk @urbanebooks #Giveaway

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I’m delighted to have been invited to take part in Simon Michael’s blog tour to celebrate the launch of The Lighterman, the third in his series of 1960s London thrillers featuring barrister antihero Charles Holborne. The Lighterman is published by Urbane Books and was released on the 8th June 2017. 

Matthew over at Urbane Books has kindly given me a paperback copy of The Lighterman as a giveaway, you will find the details on how to enter at the bottom of this post.

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imageThe first two novels in your series, The Brief and An Honest Man, both take place over the space of a few weeks in the early 1960s, but in The Lighterman you go back in time even further, to the 1940s. Why did you do that? Did you always intend to write historical thrillers?

As the series has progressed I have come to know Charles much better. Although when I wrote The Brief I knew he was an East End boy made good and he had been in a bit of trouble with the law in his past, as the series progressed what was a line drawing filled out to become a more three-dimensional portrait in my head. I began to understand his family dynamics better, his psychology, his hang-ups. There’s a major reveal coming in Book 4, and I wanted my readers to understand and believe in it. That entails revealing some of what happened to Charles as a teenager, which takes us back to 1940 and the Blitz. I also have a deeper understanding of how plot and character grow out of the fertile soil of place and history. People have commented that London has become an integral part of the stories; I would go further: I think London is a character in the series in its own right.
So, to answer your question simply, in one sense all stories are “historical” in that all characters have a background and past which dictate how they act in the present. If you want to create real characters, they can’t just arrive on the page in the present moment.

For someone who has his own particular moral code, Charles does a lot of lawbreaking in The Lighterman! Aren’t you worried that some of your readers will dislike him?

The reviews seem to suggest that the aspect of the series which appeals most to readers is Charles’s personality. My favourite, from one woman reviewer, is that she thinks she is “a little bit in love with Charles Holborne”. So I realise it’s very important not to make Charles dislikeable. At the same time, it’s his flaws that make him interesting. He went through the War, lived rough on the Blitzed streets, and grew up in an era when women with careers were oddities, men were expected to be the breadwinners and they weren’t supposed to speak about “feelings”. On top of that Charles has been damaged, and he carries that damage into his relationships with women. But as long as the reader sees that he is trying to overcome his deficiencies, that he’s essentially “a good guy” – even one who makes mistakes – I think (hope!) readers will see him as a complete person. As for his lawbreaking, he does it to save lives and to protect the innocent from the machinations of corrupt and venal men with power. I think most readers will forgive that.

You have mentioned Book 4. How many more are there to be in the series?

Charles is involved in a long-running battle with the Kray twins. They didn’t go to prison until 1968 and left a legacy that lasted some years after that. So I have at least a further five years to cover, and the undermining of The Establishment which occurred during the late 60s is a fascinating period in its own right. Books 4 and 5 are part-written. My guess is that there are at least another four books to come, but we shall see.

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About the author

Simon Michael is the author of the best-selling London 1960s noir gangster series featuring his antihero barrister, Charles Holborne. Simon writes from personal experience: he was a barrister for 37 years and worked in the Old Bailey and other criminal courts defending and prosecuting a wide selection of murderers, armed robbers, con artists and other assorted villainy during what was often considered the “Wild West” of British justice. The 1960s was a time when the Krays and the Richardsons and other violent gangs fought for control of London’s organised crime, and the corrupt Metropolitan Police beat up suspects, twisted the evidence and took their share of the criminal proceeds. Simon weaves into his thrillers genuine court documents from cases on which he worked and the big stories of the 1960s.

Simon was a successful author in the 1980s, published here and in the USA, and returned to writing when he retired from the Bar in 2016. The first two books in the Charles Holborne series, THE BRIEF published in September 2015 and AN HONEST MAN published in July 2016, have both garnered rave reviews for their authenticity and excitement. The theme of Simon’s books is alienation; Holborne, who dabbled in crime and in serious violence before becoming a barrister, is an outsider both in the East End where he grew up and in the Temples of the law where he now practices, where he faces daily class and religious prejudice. He has been compared to Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe and Dashiell Hammett’s Sam Spade, honourable men surrounded by corruption and violence, trying to steer an honest course.

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Links: Website   Blog     Facebook     Twitter    Goodreads    Amazon Author Page

Book Trailer Facebook 

 

Book description

The Lighterman is the third book in the bestselling series of legal thrillers starring barrister Charles Holborne. Simon Michael’s follow up to the bestselling The Brief and An Honest Man, continues the adventures of criminal barrister Charles Holborne.

When Charles Holborne’s cousin, Izzy, is accused of murder, Charles must dig up the secrets of the past to defend him. But brutal gangland leader Ronnie Kray will stop at nothing to get his revenge on Charles for the events of An Honest Man. Can Charles save his cousin…and his own life?

Simon Michael brings the past vividly back to life across a beautifully rendered 60s landscape, and delivers a gripping piece of thriller fiction that will excite any fan of the Britcrime genre.

Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

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I have one paperback copy of The Lighterman by Simon Michael, unfortunately this is open to UK residents only. Winner will be notified within 24 hours of winning. To enter just leave a comment in the post telling me which era you would loved to have been part of?

All entries will be put into a hat and I will get the ever suffering Mr book review cafe to pick a winner.

You can follow the rest of the tour…..

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