Friend Request by Laura Marshall #BookReview @laurajm8

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Book description

When Louise Williams receives a message from someone left long in the past she feels sick.
Maria Weston wants to be friends on Facebook.

Because Maria Weston has been missing for over twenty years. She was last seen the night of a school leavers’ party, and the world believes her to be dead. Particularly Louise, who has lived her adult life knowing herself responsible for Maria’s disappearance. But now Maria is back. Or is she?

As Maria’s messages start to escalate, Louise forces herself to reconnect with the old friends she once tried so hard to impress, to try to piece together exactly what happened that fateful night. But when another friend’s body turns up in the woods outside their old school, Louise realises she can’t trust anyone and that she must confront her own awful secret to discover the whole truth of what happened to Maria . . .

IMG_2357Friend Request deals with a very relevant and current subject, and one we all pretty much use in our daily life’s, the addictive but dreaded Facebook, we all reveal details of our life, what we ate, where we went on holiday, things we’ve done, but do you ever think about who could be reading your posts, looking at your photos without your knowledge? Are they really who they say they are? Well once you’ve read this book the paranoia will kick in and I’m sure like me you will be checking your privacy settings and friends list time and time again!

When Louise Williams receives a friends request on Facebook, a normal day occurrence for most of us, but for Louise it’s not everyday you get a request to befriend someone who has supposedly been dead for over twenty years! It’s apparent from the start that Louise is hiding something regarding Maria’s disappearance, the what and why’s are intricately revealed layer by layer in this tense psychological thriller.

Friend Request switches between the present and 1989 which reveals the events leading up to Maria’s disappearance, by using this ploy the author heightens the suspense and there’s a undercurrent of disquiet and foreboding running throughout this novel. As Maria’s messages escalate Louise is forced to examine what happened all those years ago, memories that she was preferred to keep buried.

At this point I must admit I found it hard to like any of the characters in this novel, now normally this can spoil the read for me, but fortunately it actually heightened my enjoyment as I couldn’t help but hope some of the characters would get “their just deserts”. Friend Request is a chilling psychological thriller that explores many relevant issues, with an highly original plot and taut with suspense Laura Marshall has written a very accomplished debut psychological thriller. A great read for the summer and one I would highly recommend.

Buying links:    Amazon UK 🇬🇧      Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 384 pages

Publisher: Sphere (27 July 2017)

 

I Know A Secret by Tess Gerritsen #BookReview @tessgerritsen

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Book description

In the twelfth gripping novel featuring Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles, the crime-solving duo—featured in the smash-hit TNT series Rizzoli & Isles—are faced with the gruesomely staged murder of a horror film producer.

The crime scene is unlike any that Detective Rizzoli and medical examiner Maura Isles have ever before encountered. The woman lies in apparently peaceful repose on her bed, and Maura finds no apparent cause of death, but there is no doubt the woman is indeed dead. The victim’s eyes have been removed and placed in the palm of her hand, a gesture that echoes the terrifying films she produces. Is a crazed movie fan reenacting scenes from those disturbing films?

When another victim is found, again with no apparent cause of death, again with a grotesquely staged crime scene, Jane and Maura realize the killer has widened his circle of targets. He’s chosen one particular woman for his next victim, and she knows he’s coming for her next. She’s the only one who can help Jane and Maura catch the killer.

IMG_2357I’ve been a huge fan of Tess Gerritsen since I read her first medical crime thriller Harvest way back in 1996. As far as I’m concerned the authors writing is gritty, gruesome and authentic and makes for a highly thrilling read. In this latest offering I Know A Secret we meet up with the crime solving duo Detective Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles a forensic pathologist, both characters I feel are very original protagonist’s in the world of crime thrillers. By combining the two the author delves deftly into the criminal mind and forensic sciences, which make for a fascinating and throughly gripping read. Although this is the twelfth book in the series it can easily be read as a standalone.

No plot spoilers here as all you need to know is pretty much in the book description, I always find Tess Gerritsen has the ability to grab my attention from the first intriguing chapter and keep me in her grips until the final heart stopping chapter. As you would expect from this author the murders are pretty grotesque I’m not sure where Tess Gerritsen gets her ideas from, but this is a lady with an incredible vivid and twisted imagination. There are numerous threads running through the tale and I did find myself wondering how they could all possibly connect, but the author does a magnificent job in bringing everything together in the most shocking way.

Fraught with tension the authors impeccable attention to detail make you feel like your involved in the investigation, and very much like Rizzoli and Isles you find yourself trying to unravel the clues before the killer strikes again. With red herrings a plenty the author always manages to keep one step a head of the reader, I Know A Secret definitely sent my mind into overdrive as I tried to piece the clues together. The author has a real talent for telling a story and keeping the reader guessing right to the very last moment, and once again Tess Gerritsen proves that she is still one of the leading female authors in crime fiction and rightly so.

Buying links:     Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Ballantine Books (15 Aug. 2017)

 

 

**Blog Tour** #TheGoodDaughter by Karin Slaughter #AuthorInterview #BookReview @HarperCollinsUK @SlaughterKarin

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Today I’m thrilled to be on the blog tour for The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter. I’ve always been a huge fan of this author so I literally jumped at the chance to take part in the blog tour. I never imagined when I started up my blog I would be helping to promote the book of one of the most famous crime thriller authors on the planet, so excuse me while I jump up and down with excitement!

Not only am I sharing my review for this gripping book, but I also have an author Q & A with Karin Slaughter, so without further ado………..

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You write about crimes, particularly those violent crimes against women, that are sadly all too common, but was The Good Daughter based on any specific incidents? If so, do you find that difficult to deal with?

I’m always conscious when I write about crime that this sort of thing is happening everywhere in the world, multiple times a day. Especially when you’re talking about crimes against women. The Centers for Disease control tracks the leading causes of death for all Americans and publishes their report annually. For female infants, the number one cause of death is homicide. For pregnant women, the number one cause of death is homicide. From the ages of zero to 45, you can scan the top five reasons for premature death of women and find the word “homicide” listed. So, statistically, it’s an inherently dangerous thing to be a woman. In fact, almost every act of violence that’s not gang-related generally victimizes a woman, either obliquely or directly. Even terrorist attacks like the horrible bombing in Manchester victimized women. When we have random shooters here in the US, they tend to be angry young men who generally target women, or their first victim in a shooting spree is an ex girlfriend, a mothers, or a woman they think has rejected them.

So, to answer the question, the crimes in the Good Daughter are crimes that are taking place every second of the day, and I don’t find it difficult to write about them so much as feel the weight of that responsibility to hold a mirror up to society and say, “this is happening. What are we going to do about it?”

What’s the first ever story you remember writing?

I have one of only two existing copies: The Boom Diddy Kitty. It’s about a cat who helps a kid who is not very popular.

Cats are amazing.

If you hadn’t become an author, what would you have wanted to do in life?

Being a writer is literally the only thing I’ve ever consistently wanted to do in life, from at least kindergarten. I always assumed you couldn’t make a living being a writer (and that’s true—I’m very aware of how fortunate I am) so I had back-up plans. I wanted to be a lawyer, I wanted to be a comic book illustrator, I wanted to be an astronaut…all the cool jobs. What I ended up doing was being an exterminator, then a house painter, then an employee at a sign shop, then a sign shop owner, then I got very lucky and the thing I had been toiling away at all along during my non-working-hours finally paid off and I got my first book deal. I am aware every single day that I am one of the luckiest folks on earth. Not many people do for a living exactly the job they have always wanted to do.

What’s the best thing about being a published author?

That’s honestly a hard question to answer. I get to work in my pajamas, but honestly, I wore my pajamas to work before and no one really noticed. I get to travel all over the world, which is nice because I’ve met all sorts of interesting people and that one mildy racist woman in Canberra. I love working with my editor because she really gets me. I love being able to write for a job. Maybe the coolest part is walking into a book store and seeing my books on the shelves, but not too many books because people have been reading them and the store needs to get more. That’s really one of the best things about being published—knowing my readers are out there and that they are happy with my books.

It’s certainly not being able to get an expired Nando’s card accepted for a free order of peri-peri chicken!

img_1639Karin Slaughter is the #1 internationally-bestselling author of more than a dozen novels, including the Will Trent and Grant County series and the instant New York Times bestsellers Cop Town and Pretty Girls. She has sold over 35 million books, making her one of the most popular crime writers today. She is passionate, no-nonsense, provocative, and is one of suspense fiction’s most articulate ambassadors. Her Will Trent Series, Grant County Series, and stand-alone novel Cop Town are all in development for film & television. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. You can learn more about Karin Slaughter and her books over at…….www.karinslaughter.com

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IMG_2352Twenty-eight years ago, Charlotte and Samantha Quinn’s happy smalltown family life was torn apart by a terrifying attack on their family home. It left their mother dead. It left their father – Pikeville’s notorious defence attorney – devastated. And it left the family fractured beyond repair, consumed by secrets from that terrible night.

Twenty-eight years later, and Charlie has followed in her father’s footsteps to become a lawyer herself – the archetypal good daughter. But when violence comes to Pikeville again – and a shocking tragedy leaves the whole town traumatised – Charlie is plunged into a nightmare. Not only is she the first witness on the scene, but it’s a case which can’t help triggering the terrible memories she’s spent so long trying to suppress. Because the shocking truth about the crime which destroyed her family nearly thirty years ago won’t stay buried for ever …

IMG_2298I’ve always been a huge fan of Karin Slaughter’s writing and have pretty much read every book she has ever written, so to say I was excited to see she was publishing a new novel was an understatement! The Good Daughter is a standalone, no sign of Will Trent here (I love this series by the way) and once again the author has shown why she is considered to be one of the world’s most popular and acclaimed storytellers. I was surprised to find The Good Daughter isn’t as fast paced or as graphic as the authors previous books, although some of the scenes and subject matter may not be to ever reader’s taste I must admit! After finishing The Good Daughter I definitely think this is the authors most ambitious and powerful book yet!

Like any book by this author there is plenty of mystery, terrible crimes are committed, but it also gives insight into family relationships when terrible things happen to them. Much of the book is about the horrifying events that happened to Charlie and her sister Samantha during their childhood , and how they are affecting their characters in the present and their relationships to each other and the people around them. I felt this novel was very much character led and the crimes almost felt secondary to the plot, that’s not a criticism by any means as The Good Daughter still made for a disturbing yet compelling read.

Karin Slaughter has created exceptionally complex characters, both sisters have their own demons that continue to haunt them, this novel is very much about the complexity of relationships and bad things happening to good people. Each character in The Good Daughter is garenteed to provoke a strong reactions, like anyone they have their strengths and weakness that make your own feelings towards each character sway constantly depending at what point you are in this throughly compelling read.

The author describes the small town of Pikeville so vividly it feels incredibly stifling, but also very typical, the kind of place where everyone knows you and your business, so it was intriguing to read how and why one sister choose to leave and the other one stayed, the reasons are complex but at the same time credible. Karen Slaughter never shies away from the darker side of life, in fact she hits it head on. The Good Daughter is dark, gritty and at times disturbing, with a superbly written plot, yet again the author has shown me why she continues to be one of my all time favourite authors on the planet.

Buying links:        Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 512 pages

Publisher: HarperCollins (13 July 2017)

Follow  the rest of the blog tour

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Final Girls by Riley Sager #BookReview

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Book description

Each girl survived an unthinkable horror. Now someone wants them dead…

They were the victims of separate massacres. Grouped together by the press, and dubbed the Final Girls, they are treated like something fresh out of a slasher movie.

When something terrible happens to Lisa, put-together Quincy and volatile Sam finally meet. Each one influences the other. Each one has dark secrets. And after the bloodstained fingers of the past reach into the present, each one will never be the same.

IMG_2298Final Girls is a compulsive read, with characters who are at once unreliable and sympathetic. Just when you think you’ve figured out the plot, the story pivots in a startling new direction. … A taut and original mystery that will keep you up late trying to figure out a final twist that you won’t see coming.”

If your looking for an “edge of your seat” thriller then look no further, Final Girls by Riley Sager will have you gripped from the first page, all the way to its nail biting conclusion. Final Girls tells the story of Three victims of separate massacres, they all have suffered similar experiences to those slasher movies most of us have watched, you know the ones I mean where one “Final Girl” is left in the closing scenes and manages to come out alive.

What follows is the story of two of the survivors Quincy and Sam, and that’s all I’m going to say about the plot as I would hate to give away spoilers. What drew me to this book in the first place was the author took the unusual step to focus on the survivors of the most awful crimes after the event, so this novel certainly makes for an original and compulsive read.

As you would expect both Quincy and Sam may have survived shocking and traumatic events but neither of them have come out unscathed, at the start they both seem pretty average until the author weaves her magic and you realise both characters are not only complex but also very damaged by their traumatic experiences and they seem untrustworthy, and for me that’s what made this novel such a compelling read.

With twist and turns galore it’s pretty much impossible to “second guess” where the author is leading the reader, but I certainly enjoyed every minute of this dark crime thriller. Full of mystery and suspense this novel certainly fray’s the nerves, as the tension and suspense reaches fever pitch before the final shocking scenes. Riley Sager without doubt has written a novel that makes for a tense and exhilarating read and if you are a fan of a well written crime thriller then this is one book you don’t want to miss.

Buying links:   Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

Hardcover: 352 pages

Publisher: Ebury Press (Fiction) (13 July 2017

 

The Serial Killer’s Daughter by Lesley Welsh #BookReview @Bookouture

 

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Book description

Lesley Welsh sadly passed away in April but Bookouture are extremely honoured to be publishing The Serial Killer’s Daughter on 14th June.

Charmer, liar, father… Killer.

Suzanne’s life changes forever the day she receives a visit from Rose Anderson, the woman who has been living with her estranged father, Don.

Don is dead, but Rose wants Suzanne to have his possessions – including a series of intimate diaries and a mysterious collection of photographs of women.

To Suzanne’s shock, one of the photos is of her friend Sophie, who died ten years ago in an unexplained and devastating fire.

But Don only met Sophie once, on an unsettling visit he paid Suzanne just days before Sophie’s death… So why did he have a picture of her?

Unable to let Sophie’s memory alone, Suzanne begins to dig into her father’s life. What horrors is she about to unearth in his journals? And who is it that’s out there, watching her every move?

img_1258Oh my goodness what a dark and twisted read The Serial Killers Daughter by Lesley Welsh turned out to be. Gripping from the first page, this book will keep you on the edge of your seat all the way to its shocking conclusion. The author has given the reader a roller coaster of a thriller that’s for sure, but this crime thriller is also a gripping story of the psychology of evil and the lengths people will go to meet their own needs.

Suzanne’s estranged father Don passes away. His girlfriend Rose wants Suzanne to have his possessions – including a series of intimate diaries and a mysterious collection of photographs of women, which leads Suzanne to start looking into her fathers past, what follows is a tense and a highly disturbing read. This novel does contain explicit scenes and language so definitely not one for the faint hearted but in the authors defence it’s in keeping with the plot and characters.

The author has created one of the most despicable and cold hearted psychopaths I’ve ever come across, they are the definition of evil, they made my skin crawl and my heart race, this is one book I wouldn’t recommend for a “bedtime read” unless you want nightmares. The constant sense of madness and evil bubbling away below the surface made this a highly compelling read.

I do have one small niggle I feel this book would have worked so much better with a different title, I would have enjoyed it slightly more if the mystery of Don could have been revealed without any preconceived ideas of the nature of the plot. On the positive side Lesley Welsh deftly manages to reveal Don’s secrets layer by layer, painting a chilling picture of the darkest corners of the human mind. The Serial Killers Daughter makes for a chilling yet engrossing read and if you like your crime thrillers dark, well they don’t come much darker than this one.

Buying links:   Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 343 pages

Publisher: Bookouture (14 Jun. 2017)

 

**Blog Tour** Sweet Little Lies by Caz Frear #GuestPost (@CazziF) @BonnierZaffre

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I am delighted to welcome you to my stop on the Sweet Little Lies blog tour. Sweet Little Lies is written by debut author, Caz Frear and was named the winner of the Richard and Judy Search for a Bestseller competition in conjunction with retailer WHSmith. To celebrate the release of this crime thriller  I have a fantastic guest post (yay! I do love a guest post!) So without further ado, I’ll hand over to Caz…

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In defence of self-doubt – overcome it or work with it?

It’s a can-of-worms debate, and yet still a widely-held view, that crippling self-doubt is more of a female thing. Study after study seem to indicate that while men approach a challenge thinking they’ll naturally ace it, women, on the whole, expect the worst.

I’m not entirely sure where I stand on this. It seems a bit black and white, a bit ‘Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus’, although I’ll admit in my case, it’s 100% true. My school reports were littered with comments like, “Caroline has the ability but not the confidence,” and while I’d argue that in maths, physics and geography, they were being too kind as I had no ability at all, in all other subjects their assessments were bang on. Even in English, no matter how many A grades I amassed in every piece of coursework and exam, I still assumed that the next one would go badly. It’s a ‘girl thing’, I heard my teachers say on more than one occasion. But I’m no longer a girl. And with age should come confidence, surely?

It appears not. I am female and worse still, I’m a female writer, and therefore popular myth states that I must doubt myself as readily as I breathe.

I read an interview with Marian Keyes many years ago where she said – although I’m paraphrasing a little – that every day she sits down to write, she wonders if it’s the day the words leave her. The day she has to admit that all her previous bestsellers were mere flukes and she’s been trading on luck. The day the world realises that she’s simply not good enough at writing.

Yep. Marian Keyes said that. Hilarious, incisive, warm, multi-talented Marian Keyes.

What chance the rest of us??

My debut novel, Sweet Little Lies, came out on Thursday. It won the Richard & Judy Search for a Bestseller competition and has had unbelievably generous reviews from some amazing crime fiction authors (still fainting over Lynda La Plante and Ann Cleeves!) In addition to this, my agent and my editor have never been anything short of insanely passionate about my writing but right now, as Sweet Little Lies goes out into the world, I’m still asking myself the same question. Still tormenting myself with the same fears.

Is it really any good?

Am I about to be ‘found out’ for being the ‘average-on-a-good-day writer’ that Self-Doubt keeps insisting I am?

And if it really is any good, and no-one is about to ‘out’ me as possibly-the-worst-published-author-in-all-of-history, how can I ever repeat the success with Book 2? I mean, what if I’m a one-book wonder? The literary equivalent of Chesney Hawkes.

Sweet Little Lies was written against a backdrop of 90% gnawing self-doubt and 10% soaring over-confidence. There’s very little in between however I’m told that’s normal. The soaring over-confidence comes when what’s in your head appears on the page perfectly formed. When you completely nail a description, or a feeling. When you feel your heart pounding in the tense scenes or you well up during a sad exchange. In those rare moments, you dream of success, unreservedly. In fact, you’ve made it already. You’ve managed to craft one perfect paragraph and now the Booker Prize beckons.

You are at one with The Words.

ALERT. This is not a good thing.

“Bad writers tend to have the self-confidence, while the good ones tend to have self-doubt,” Charles Bukowski lamented in an interview, and the man couldn’t be more right. It’s during these self-confidence surges that you’ll do your most cringey writing – the purple prose that adds nothing to the story other than to show the reader how clever you are (the reader almost always thinks it’s boring, not clever). It’s during these surges that you’ll become convinced you can find a far superior way to say, “He sat on the chair” than any other writer that has gone before you.

You can’t. And there’s no need to. Self-doubt reins you in from all this floweriness.

There are several other reasons why it’s a good thing too.

If you don’t have self-doubt, then what’s the alternative – complacency? We can all probably think of an author who we used to love but we now feel has lost it a little over the years. This happens in series crime the most – knowing you have a winning formula that can be relied doesn’t always inspire new heights of creativity.

Self-doubt makes you question everything about your book. Is that periphery character really needed? Is the sub-plot superfluous? Are 4 narrators too many? Is the swearing too much? Over-confidence leads to less questioning.

Self-doubt encourages you to go the extra mile – if don’t believe you’re the bees knees, you’ll work twice as hard to get there.

Self-doubt/self-reflection is a common trait in a lot of crime protagonists and literally feeling how your character feels is no bad thing.

And most importantly, the ONLY way to slap down self-doubt is through action. And it’s only action that gets books written!

About the author

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Caz Frear grew up in Coventry and spent her teenage years dreaming of moving to London and writing a novel. After fulfilling her first dream, it wasn’t until she moved back to Coventry thirteen years later that the writing dream finally came true.
She has a first-class degree in History & Politics, which she’s put to enormous use over the years by working as a waitress, shop assistant, retail merchandiser and, for the past twelve years, a headhunter.
When she’s not agonising over snappy dialogue or incisive prose, she can be found shouting at the TV when Arsenal are playing or holding court in the pub on topics she knows nothing about.

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Book description

What happens when the trust has gone?

Cat Kinsella was always a daddy’s girl. Until the summer of 1998 when she sees her father flirting with seventeen-year-old Maryanne Doyle.

When Maryanne later disappears and Cat’s father denies ever knowing her, Cat’s relationship with him is changed forever.

Eighteen years later, Cat is now a Detective Constable with the Met. Called to the scene of a murder in Islington, she discovers a woman’s body: Alice Lapaine has been found strangled, not far from the pub that Cat’s father runs.

When evidence links Alice to the still missing Maryanne, all Cat’s fears about her father resurface. Could he really be a killer? Determined to confront the past and find out what really happened to Maryanne all those years ago, Cat begins to dig into the case. But the problem with looking into the past is that sometimes you might not like what you find.

For fans of Erin Kelly and Belinda Bauer, Sweet Little Lies is a suspenseful page-turner from a talented new voice.

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**Blog Tour** Wolves In The Dark by Gunnar Staalesen @OrendaBooks #BookReview

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Today I’m hosting The Wolves In The Dark by Gunnar Staalesen blog tour,  which is published by the fantastic Orenda Books. I’m thrilled to be able to share my review for this gripping and very disturbing book. Many thanks to Karen Sullivan over at Orenda Books and Anne Cater for allowing me to be part of this awesome blog tour.

Book description

PI Varg Veum fights for his reputation, his freedom and his life, when child pornography is found on his computer and he is arrested and jailed. Worse still, his memory is a blank…
Reeling from the death of his great love, Karin, Varg Veum’s life has descended into a self-destructive spiral of alcohol, lust, grief and blackouts.
When traces of child pornography are found on his computer, he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring and thrown into a prison cell.

There, he struggles to sift through his past to work out who is responsible for planting the material… and who is seeking the ultimate revenge.
When a chance to escape presents itself, Varg finds himself on the run in his hometown of Bergen. With the clock ticking and the police on his tail, Varg takes on his hardest – and most personal – case yet.

Chilling, shocking and exceptionally gripping, Wolves in the Dark reaffirms Gunnar Staalesen as one of the world’s foremost thriller writers.

img_1258I thought I had made a huge blunder agreeing to review Wolves In The Dark, I didn’t realise it was the 21st book in the series, so I pretty much convinced myself that I would find this a difficult novel to read, I hate starting a series a couple of books in let alone 21! I always find it hard to connect with the characters. I’m thrilled to report that all my worries were unfounded and Wolves In The Dark made for a throughly gripping read and yes it can be read as a standalone.

Wolves in the Dark doesn’t ease you in gently to it’s plot from the first chapter where PI Varg Veum is arrested for having child pornography on his computer and he’s accused of being part of a paedophile ring you know you are in for a dark and disturbing read. There’s no doubt about it Wolves In The Dark is not always an easy read, while it never felt gratuitous within the context of the story, I can see that this won’t be to everyone’s tastes due to the subject matter.

Varg is one complex character he’s a damaged soul, he much prefers to drown his sorrows in alcohol so he doesn’t have to deal with his grief, but despite the darkness surrounding him I also find something intriguing about this well established character. I do feel there is a lot of history to his character, history I’ve missed out on as I haven’t read previous books in the series, but overall I still managed to get a “feel” for this complex yet intriguing character.

As Varg looks back on past cases and the enemies he’s made looking to find answers to his current predicament, the pages of this cracking plot are fraught with suspense and you can’t help but wonder where the author is heading with this gritty yet compelling tale. I did find some parts confusing due to the number of characters involved in the plot and the numerous threads, but that said the author expertly manages to bring everything together masterfully.

After I finished Wolves In The Dark I’ve come to the conclusion that although I’ve come to this series late, it really did not spoil my enjoyment of this well written novel. I would like to think at some point I will go back and read early books in this series, but if I don’t get the chance it’s definitely a series I will read from here on in. Superbly paced with a disturbing plot Gunnar Staalesen has written an outstanding book in Nordic noir, it has so many elements that made this a gripping read. If you like your thrillers dark and gritty then this is definitely the book for you.

Buy links:   Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 276 pages

Publisher: ORENDA BOOKS (9 May 2017)

About the author

Granite Noir Fest 2017

Gunnar Staalesen was born in Bergen, Norway in 1947. He made his debut at the age of 22 with Seasons of Innocence and in 1977 he published the first book in the Varg Veum series. He is the author of over 20 titles, which have been published in 24 countries and sold over four million copies. Twelve film adaptations of his Varg Veum crime novels have appeared since 2007, starring the popular Norwegian actor Trond Epsen Seim. Staalesen, who has won three Golden Pistols (including the Prize of Honour), lives in Bergen with his wife. When Prince Charles visited Bergen, Staalesen was appointed his official tour guide. There is a life-sized statue of Varg Veum in the centre of Bergen, and a host of Varg Veum memorabilia for sale. We Shall Inherit the Wind and Where Roses Never Die were both international bestsellers.

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