**Blog Tour** Unforgivable by Mike Thomas #Review & #GuestPost @ItDaFiveOh @BonnierZaffre

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Today I’m thrilled to be the next stop on the Unforgivable by Mike Thomas blog tour. Not only do I get to share my review for this thrilling book, but I also have a fabulous guest post from the author about the places that inspired the locations in Unforgivable. Interestingly enough my son and his wife had their wedding photographs taken in Roath Park one of the settings the author mentions.

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My Cardiff: the places that inspired locations in ‘Unforgivable’

It’s safe to say I know Cardiff like the back of my hand.
The nice regions and the dodgy areas, the best route to take to avoid rush hour traffic, the lanes and parks and alleys where gangs from rival estates used to meet for a rumble on a Friday night (Birdies Lane, if you must know). Where you can get stolen electrical equipment for a very low price. Where you can get a good kicking just for walking into the wrong pub.

I worked the city for twenty years, first as a uniformed officer then with stints on CID before moving on to drugs teams and other plain clothes work where I’d follow heroin dealers to Bristol and not see my own bed for three days. Finally – when my first novel was published and I knew I was on my way out of The Job and the hierarchy didn’t really know what to do with me – I found myself in the Operations Room working as an – haha – Intelligence Officer.

If you want a guided tour – warts and all – of the Welsh capital, I’m your man. And that knowledge was one of the reasons I decided to set the MacReady novels in the city. Also, London has its fair share of fictional cops and I felt Cardiff, bar a few novels, wasn’t really getting a look in. I wanted to redress the balance a little.
So what are the locations that appear in ‘Unforgivable’?

St. David’s – huge, sprawling and full of Shiny Things You Will Want, this shopping centre – or mall, if you must – has grown and been added to and modified extensively over the decades, and has become a colossal ode to commerce. Everything you want – and quite a lot you don’t – can be found under its roofs, and its food court is where things take a sudden, nasty turn in the book. I used to work here as a late-teenager at John Menzies (remember those stores?) where I would lump myself behind the counter of the music section, rolling my eyes at customers’ terrible purchases – Duran Duran, heaven forfend! – and making sure Depeche Mode’s output was at the forefront of every display. They are the greatest band in the world, after all.

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Fairwater – tucked just west of the city centre is this sprawling, leafy suburb where MacReady and the team carry out a property search after they’ve arrested their bad guy. In real life I worked in the building adjacent to the police station – that aforementioned Intel Officer role – until I quit for good. A busy ‘nick’, Fairwater Police Station is also uglier than ugly, and I describe it in the novel as ‘a mixed orange-brick and prefab square lump that resembled a hideous layer cake, and which MacReady assumed had cut the value of the surrounding properties by at least half when it was built.’ This is entirely correct and I refuse to describe it otherwise. So there.

Park Place – when I were a lad, and when Cardiff’ had pretty limited places to go of an evening, Park Place just off the main pedestrianised shopping drag was the epicentre of all the fun for a few good years. ‘Brannigans’ bar (now ‘Jongleurs’ comedy club), and around the corner the superclub ‘Zeus’ attracted thousands of punters from all around South Wales, where we revelled in this new-fangled tunesmithery of ‘Britpop’ (and, of course, ‘Cool Cymru’). ‘Zeus’ is replicated in ‘Unforgivable’ for an important scene, and it was lovely to dredge up all those memories. Apart from the time I accidentally set fire to a girl’s leggings while I was trying to impress her with my cigarette lighter-wielding skills. Turns out polyester is really flammable. Who knew?

City Hall – the heart of the capital’s bureaucratic and judicial area, a place of ornate gardens and Portland Stone edifices and the imposing Crown Court, and a prime choice for weddings and University graduation ceremonies. It’s also the scene of several foot chases in my career, one of which ended up with me falling in a very nice pond. My protagonist, MacReady, has a similar chase at one point in ‘Unforgivable’ but manages to avoid the watery mishap…

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Roath Park – locally famous, this pretty sliver of water and greenery just north of the city centre has a boating lake, clock tower, enormo-conservatory and ornamental gardens, and is something of a rite of passage for children who descend here en masse in school holidays to slide down its notoriously bumpy slide and get chased by irate swans. It features briefly in ‘Unforgivable’ during a vehicle pursuit. It is also where, as a five year old bored of her whining, I threw my infant sister into the water while we were out in a rowing boat. Fun times!

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The UHW – the University Hospital of Wales, or ‘The Heath’ to Cardiffians. As a copper you spend an inordinate amount of time in hospitals – sitting with injured prisoners, dealing with sudden deaths, removing brawling drunks from A&E – and the UHW was my home from home at certain points in my career. MacReady and his colleagues have to deal with the terrible aftermath of the bombings at the market and mosque in The Heath – but it is a nameless, injured young woman who leads him to discover there is more going on in the city than the police first realised. Woo, excitement!

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Book description

Bombs detonate in a busy souk, causing massive devastation.
An explosion rips apart a mosque, killing and injuring those inside.
But this isn’t the Middle East – this is Cardiff . . .

In a city where tensions are already running high, DC Will MacReady and his colleagues begin the desperate hunt for the attacker. If they knew the ‘why’, then surely they can find the ‘who’? But that isn’t so easy, and time is fast running out . . .

MacReady is still trying to prove himself after the horrific events of the previous year, which left his sergeant injured and his job in jeopardy, so he feels sidelined when he’s asked to investigate a vicious knife attack on a young woman.

But all is not as it seems with his new case, and soon MacReady must put everything on the line in order to do what is right.

IMG_2357 I didn’t realise Unforgettable was the second book in the MacReady series, if I’m honest I’m not one for jumping ahead in a series as I fear I might have missed something, and although it’s obvious that DC Will MacReady has issues that pertain to the previous book I still think Unforgettable made for an extremely gripping standalone. It’s pretty standard to have a detective in a crime thriller with issues and MacReady is no different, his personal life is one huge disaster but I still found him to be an interesting character. The commaradie amongst his fellow work colleagues added just the right amount of “gallows” humour to add.

Unforgettable begins with a “bang” literally when a bomb detonated in a busy Souk in the middle of Cardiff causes massive devastation as you can well imagine. We only have to pick up a newspaper or turn on the news to see events like this are very sadly part of our times, so the opening chapters were terrifyingly credible and shocking. What at first appears to be a racially motivated attack soon becomes something much more complex and Unforgettable made for a gritty fast paced read.

There are numerous strands to Unforgettable the bombings, a vicious knife attack, a group of Asians on trial for the vicious assault and murder of a young white male, all these events appear to be unrelated but are they? Well here’s where the author deftly leads the reader through the police investigation, revealing clues and red herrings aplenty.

Mike Thomas own career as a policeman adds authenticity to Unforgettable, the investigation, the dynamics within the team all give the reader insight into the workers of an investigation. You can help but feel the same frustrations that MacReady and his team have to endure on a daily basis. Fast paced and fraught with tension I found Unforgivable to be a “white knuckle” read, covering a very frighteningly credible topic. Action packed and filled with intrigue Unforgivable combines police procedure with a powerful and thrilling plot making for a throughly gripping read.

Buying link: Amazon UK 🇬🇧Print Length: 400 pages

Publisher: Zaffre (27 July 2017)

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Mike Thomas was born in 1971 in the Welsh town of Caerphilly, famed for being the birthplace of comedian Tommy Cooper, its ‘deliciously’ salty cheese, and its castle with a tower which allegedly leans at a sharper angle than the more celebrated one in Pisa.

His teenage years were spent breakdancing, spraying graffiti around the town’s walls and office blocks and just about staying on the right side of the law, until his early twenties when, inexplicably, he joined the local constabulary and began locking people up for spraying graffiti around the town’s walls and office blocks.

“…inexplicably, he joined the local constabulary and began locking people up for spraying graffiti around the town’s walls and office blocks…”

While working as a plod in Wales’ capital city of Cardiff, Thomas continued with his childhood passion: writing. As a freelance he produced articles for local newspapers, various websites and national travel magazines, while in 2007 he was one of the winners in the annual Rhys Davies Short Story Competition organised by Literature Wales. After completing a Master’s degree in Creative Writing at the University of Wales between 2007 and 2009, Thomas published his debut novel, Pocket Notebook, in 2010 with William Heinemann/Penguin Random House.

The author was on the prestigious list of Waterstones’ ‘New Voices’ for that year, while Pocket Notebook was longlisted for the Wales Book of the Year and optioned for television by Carnival Films, the producers of Downton Abbey. His second novel, Ugly Bus, was released by Heinemann in 2014 and is currently in development as a six part television series with the BBC. Both novels deal with the uglier side of policing.

“…He currently lives in the wilds of Portugal with his wife and children…”

Thomas left the police in the spring of 2015 and grew his hair and a pathetic attempt at a beard. He currently lives in the wilds of Portugal with his wife and children. Alongside chopping wood, cementing crumbling house walls and trying to find somewhere that sells his beloved Marmite, he continues to write articles and web pieces for a variety of sites and publications, and is contracted to London’s Bonnier Publishing for three new novels, the first of which – Ash and Bones – was released August 2016. The second in the series, Unforgivable, is due for publication in the summer of 2017.

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Links to author: Website Twitter Facebook

Follow the Unforgivable blog tour ………..

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The Walls by Hollie Overton #BookReview

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Book description

What if you could get away with murder?

Single mom Kristy Tucker works as press agent for the Texas Department of Corrections – handling everything on death row, from inmate interviews to chronicling the last moments during an execution. Her job exposes Kristy to the worst of humanity and it’s one that’s beginning to take its toll.

So when Kristy meets Lance Dobson, her son’s martial arts instructor, she believed she finally found her happy ending. She was wrong.

Kristy soon discovers that Lance is a monster. Forced to endure his verbal and physical abuse, Kristy is serving her own life sentence . . . unless she’s willing to take matters into her hands. Perfectly poised to exploit the criminal justice system she knows so well, Kristy sets out to get rid of Lance – permanently.

IMG_2357There are plenty of psychological thrillers on the market that deal with domestic abuse and I’ve read a large majority of them, so I’m always looking for something that makes a story “unique”, a book that stands out from the crowd. The Walls connection to death row makes this book original and I really had high hopes for the latest book by Hollie Overton as it’s a book that explores domestic violence, the morality of murder and how far one woman will go to protect her family.

Personally I found The Walls a slow burner, in the authors defence she spends the time developing her characters and their background. We learn how Kristy is a single mum working as a Public Information Officer for the Texas Dept of Corrections, dealing with death row inmates, housed in The Walls. Her life pretty much revolves around her job, her teen age son and her elderly father. So when the charming Lance enters her life, Kirsten thinks she’s found her “happy ever after” but things take a sinster and dangerous turn and Kirsty soon realises she’s made the biggest mistake of her life. Kirsty thought the biggest monsters were the ones behind “The Walls” but she soon learns that’s not necessarily true.

It was interesting to see how Kristy’s opinions of the Death Row inmates changed as Lance’s violence and mind games escalated. I should point out at this point although this book deals with a difficult subject the author never goes over board, but just gives enough detail to show how abuse both mental and physical escalates. The letters that Kristy receives from an inmate highlight the injustices that exist within the walks, but it’s these letters that give her the strength and determination to do everything she can to protect herself and her family.

Although I enjoyed The Walls and it made for a quick read I did feel this book lacked the “thrilling” element, I really thought the author was going to throw in an almighty twist but unfortunately it never came to light. Although the story gathers momentum and suspense at the half way mark I was expecting something more. I’m sure there will be many readers who will rave about this book and I can see why, but I think because I read so many books in this genre I expected more thrills and chills, I want to finish a book thinking “WOW” unfortunately this wasn’t the case. I think I sometimes expect to much from a book and it’s author, and I definitely think The Walls is one of those books where I’m going to be in the minority.

Buying links:  Amazon UK 🇬🇧

Amazon U S 🇺🇸

Hardcover: 416 pages

Publisher: Century (10 Aug. 2017)

Unravelling Oliver by Liz Nugent #BookReview @lizzienugent

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Book description

“I expected more of a reaction the first time I hit her.”

So begins Liz Nugent’s astonishing debut novel—a chilling, elegantly crafted, and psychologically astute exploration of the nature of evil.

Oliver Ryan, handsome, charismatic, and successful, has long been married to his devoted wife, Alice. Together they write and illustrate award-winning children’s books; their life together one of enviable privilege and ease—until, one evening after a delightful dinner, Oliver delivers a blow to Alice that renders her unconscious, and subsequently beats her into a coma.

In the aftermath of such an unthinkable event, as Alice hovers between life and death, the couple’s friends, neighbours, and acquaintances try to understand what could have driven Oliver to commit such a horrific act. As his story unfolds, layers are peeled away to reveal a life of shame, envy, deception, and masterful manipulation.

IMG_2357Imagine if people you met through life, neighbours, family, and friends narrated the story of your life would it make for an interesting read? Or would it make a disturbing one? That’s precisely what happens in Unravelling Oliver. You know from the first chilling sentence “I expected more of a reaction the first time I hit her” where Oliver is talking about Alice his devoted wife that he isn’t a pleasant man, but I never expected such a shocking and gripping unveiling of a sociopath, as seen from different people’s viewpoints. The author expertly “unravels” the psyche of a very damaged Oliver in a gripping read that I read in one sitting.

One night Oliver beats Alice and she ends up in a coma. What happened to make Oliver a handsome, charismatic, and successful author do something so terrible? Various characters narrate Oliver’s story friends, family and acquaintances even Oliver himself. Slowly layer by layer each characters story “unravels” Oliver and the events that have shaped him into the person he has become.

This is a relatively short book at 240 pages, but even if it had been much longer I would still have had to read it in one sitting. Unravelling Oliver isn’t a fast paced novel by any means as it’s character led, but don’t let that put you off as it’s the extraordinary characters that make this novel such an exceptional read. Every character has their story to tale about Oliver some more chilling than others, Liz Nugent has managed to breathe life into each and everyone of her characters, and it was extraordinary reading how one person could shape some many people’s life’s in the worse possible ways.

I couldn’t help but have some empathy for Oliver as you learn more about him you realise how damaged he is, there are so many strands to Oliver, his childhood, his marriage and his relationships which made for a throughly compelling read. I found Unravelling Oliver to be a real page turner, an intelligent psychological thriller with heart. I’m ashamed to say this is the first book I’ve read by Liz Nugent and I’m kicking myself as it’s obvious the author is one very talented author.

Buying links: Amazon UK 🇬🇧 Amazon US 🇺🇸

Paperback: 240 pages

Publisher: Penguin (9 April 2015)

 

Friend Request by Laura Marshall #BookReview @laurajm8

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Book description

When Louise Williams receives a message from someone left long in the past she feels sick.
Maria Weston wants to be friends on Facebook.

Because Maria Weston has been missing for over twenty years. She was last seen the night of a school leavers’ party, and the world believes her to be dead. Particularly Louise, who has lived her adult life knowing herself responsible for Maria’s disappearance. But now Maria is back. Or is she?

As Maria’s messages start to escalate, Louise forces herself to reconnect with the old friends she once tried so hard to impress, to try to piece together exactly what happened that fateful night. But when another friend’s body turns up in the woods outside their old school, Louise realises she can’t trust anyone and that she must confront her own awful secret to discover the whole truth of what happened to Maria . . .

IMG_2357Friend Request deals with a very relevant and current subject, and one we all pretty much use in our daily life’s, the addictive but dreaded Facebook, we all reveal details of our life, what we ate, where we went on holiday, things we’ve done, but do you ever think about who could be reading your posts, looking at your photos without your knowledge? Are they really who they say they are? Well once you’ve read this book the paranoia will kick in and I’m sure like me you will be checking your privacy settings and friends list time and time again!

When Louise Williams receives a friends request on Facebook, a normal day occurrence for most of us, but for Louise it’s not everyday you get a request to befriend someone who has supposedly been dead for over twenty years! It’s apparent from the start that Louise is hiding something regarding Maria’s disappearance, the what and why’s are intricately revealed layer by layer in this tense psychological thriller.

Friend Request switches between the present and 1989 which reveals the events leading up to Maria’s disappearance, by using this ploy the author heightens the suspense and there’s a undercurrent of disquiet and foreboding running throughout this novel. As Maria’s messages escalate Louise is forced to examine what happened all those years ago, memories that she was preferred to keep buried.

At this point I must admit I found it hard to like any of the characters in this novel, now normally this can spoil the read for me, but fortunately it actually heightened my enjoyment as I couldn’t help but hope some of the characters would get “their just deserts”. Friend Request is a chilling psychological thriller that explores many relevant issues, with an highly original plot and taut with suspense Laura Marshall has written a very accomplished debut psychological thriller. A great read for the summer and one I would highly recommend.

Buying links:    Amazon UK 🇬🇧      Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 384 pages

Publisher: Sphere (27 July 2017)

 

I Know A Secret by Tess Gerritsen #BookReview @tessgerritsen

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Book description

In the twelfth gripping novel featuring Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles, the crime-solving duo—featured in the smash-hit TNT series Rizzoli & Isles—are faced with the gruesomely staged murder of a horror film producer.

The crime scene is unlike any that Detective Rizzoli and medical examiner Maura Isles have ever before encountered. The woman lies in apparently peaceful repose on her bed, and Maura finds no apparent cause of death, but there is no doubt the woman is indeed dead. The victim’s eyes have been removed and placed in the palm of her hand, a gesture that echoes the terrifying films she produces. Is a crazed movie fan reenacting scenes from those disturbing films?

When another victim is found, again with no apparent cause of death, again with a grotesquely staged crime scene, Jane and Maura realize the killer has widened his circle of targets. He’s chosen one particular woman for his next victim, and she knows he’s coming for her next. She’s the only one who can help Jane and Maura catch the killer.

IMG_2357I’ve been a huge fan of Tess Gerritsen since I read her first medical crime thriller Harvest way back in 1996. As far as I’m concerned the authors writing is gritty, gruesome and authentic and makes for a highly thrilling read. In this latest offering I Know A Secret we meet up with the crime solving duo Detective Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles a forensic pathologist, both characters I feel are very original protagonist’s in the world of crime thrillers. By combining the two the author delves deftly into the criminal mind and forensic sciences, which make for a fascinating and throughly gripping read. Although this is the twelfth book in the series it can easily be read as a standalone.

No plot spoilers here as all you need to know is pretty much in the book description, I always find Tess Gerritsen has the ability to grab my attention from the first intriguing chapter and keep me in her grips until the final heart stopping chapter. As you would expect from this author the murders are pretty grotesque I’m not sure where Tess Gerritsen gets her ideas from, but this is a lady with an incredible vivid and twisted imagination. There are numerous threads running through the tale and I did find myself wondering how they could all possibly connect, but the author does a magnificent job in bringing everything together in the most shocking way.

Fraught with tension the authors impeccable attention to detail make you feel like your involved in the investigation, and very much like Rizzoli and Isles you find yourself trying to unravel the clues before the killer strikes again. With red herrings a plenty the author always manages to keep one step a head of the reader, I Know A Secret definitely sent my mind into overdrive as I tried to piece the clues together. The author has a real talent for telling a story and keeping the reader guessing right to the very last moment, and once again Tess Gerritsen proves that she is still one of the leading female authors in crime fiction and rightly so.

Buying links:     Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

Hardcover: 336 pages
Publisher: Ballantine Books (15 Aug. 2017)

 

 

**Blog Tour** #TheGoodDaughter by Karin Slaughter #AuthorInterview #BookReview @HarperCollinsUK @SlaughterKarin

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Today I’m thrilled to be on the blog tour for The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter. I’ve always been a huge fan of this author so I literally jumped at the chance to take part in the blog tour. I never imagined when I started up my blog I would be helping to promote the book of one of the most famous crime thriller authors on the planet, so excuse me while I jump up and down with excitement!

Not only am I sharing my review for this gripping book, but I also have an author Q & A with Karin Slaughter, so without further ado………..

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You write about crimes, particularly those violent crimes against women, that are sadly all too common, but was The Good Daughter based on any specific incidents? If so, do you find that difficult to deal with?

I’m always conscious when I write about crime that this sort of thing is happening everywhere in the world, multiple times a day. Especially when you’re talking about crimes against women. The Centers for Disease control tracks the leading causes of death for all Americans and publishes their report annually. For female infants, the number one cause of death is homicide. For pregnant women, the number one cause of death is homicide. From the ages of zero to 45, you can scan the top five reasons for premature death of women and find the word “homicide” listed. So, statistically, it’s an inherently dangerous thing to be a woman. In fact, almost every act of violence that’s not gang-related generally victimizes a woman, either obliquely or directly. Even terrorist attacks like the horrible bombing in Manchester victimized women. When we have random shooters here in the US, they tend to be angry young men who generally target women, or their first victim in a shooting spree is an ex girlfriend, a mothers, or a woman they think has rejected them.

So, to answer the question, the crimes in the Good Daughter are crimes that are taking place every second of the day, and I don’t find it difficult to write about them so much as feel the weight of that responsibility to hold a mirror up to society and say, “this is happening. What are we going to do about it?”

What’s the first ever story you remember writing?

I have one of only two existing copies: The Boom Diddy Kitty. It’s about a cat who helps a kid who is not very popular.

Cats are amazing.

If you hadn’t become an author, what would you have wanted to do in life?

Being a writer is literally the only thing I’ve ever consistently wanted to do in life, from at least kindergarten. I always assumed you couldn’t make a living being a writer (and that’s true—I’m very aware of how fortunate I am) so I had back-up plans. I wanted to be a lawyer, I wanted to be a comic book illustrator, I wanted to be an astronaut…all the cool jobs. What I ended up doing was being an exterminator, then a house painter, then an employee at a sign shop, then a sign shop owner, then I got very lucky and the thing I had been toiling away at all along during my non-working-hours finally paid off and I got my first book deal. I am aware every single day that I am one of the luckiest folks on earth. Not many people do for a living exactly the job they have always wanted to do.

What’s the best thing about being a published author?

That’s honestly a hard question to answer. I get to work in my pajamas, but honestly, I wore my pajamas to work before and no one really noticed. I get to travel all over the world, which is nice because I’ve met all sorts of interesting people and that one mildy racist woman in Canberra. I love working with my editor because she really gets me. I love being able to write for a job. Maybe the coolest part is walking into a book store and seeing my books on the shelves, but not too many books because people have been reading them and the store needs to get more. That’s really one of the best things about being published—knowing my readers are out there and that they are happy with my books.

It’s certainly not being able to get an expired Nando’s card accepted for a free order of peri-peri chicken!

img_1639Karin Slaughter is the #1 internationally-bestselling author of more than a dozen novels, including the Will Trent and Grant County series and the instant New York Times bestsellers Cop Town and Pretty Girls. She has sold over 35 million books, making her one of the most popular crime writers today. She is passionate, no-nonsense, provocative, and is one of suspense fiction’s most articulate ambassadors. Her Will Trent Series, Grant County Series, and stand-alone novel Cop Town are all in development for film & television. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. You can learn more about Karin Slaughter and her books over at…….www.karinslaughter.com

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IMG_2352Twenty-eight years ago, Charlotte and Samantha Quinn’s happy smalltown family life was torn apart by a terrifying attack on their family home. It left their mother dead. It left their father – Pikeville’s notorious defence attorney – devastated. And it left the family fractured beyond repair, consumed by secrets from that terrible night.

Twenty-eight years later, and Charlie has followed in her father’s footsteps to become a lawyer herself – the archetypal good daughter. But when violence comes to Pikeville again – and a shocking tragedy leaves the whole town traumatised – Charlie is plunged into a nightmare. Not only is she the first witness on the scene, but it’s a case which can’t help triggering the terrible memories she’s spent so long trying to suppress. Because the shocking truth about the crime which destroyed her family nearly thirty years ago won’t stay buried for ever …

IMG_2298I’ve always been a huge fan of Karin Slaughter’s writing and have pretty much read every book she has ever written, so to say I was excited to see she was publishing a new novel was an understatement! The Good Daughter is a standalone, no sign of Will Trent here (I love this series by the way) and once again the author has shown why she is considered to be one of the world’s most popular and acclaimed storytellers. I was surprised to find The Good Daughter isn’t as fast paced or as graphic as the authors previous books, although some of the scenes and subject matter may not be to ever reader’s taste I must admit! After finishing The Good Daughter I definitely think this is the authors most ambitious and powerful book yet!

Like any book by this author there is plenty of mystery, terrible crimes are committed, but it also gives insight into family relationships when terrible things happen to them. Much of the book is about the horrifying events that happened to Charlie and her sister Samantha during their childhood , and how they are affecting their characters in the present and their relationships to each other and the people around them. I felt this novel was very much character led and the crimes almost felt secondary to the plot, that’s not a criticism by any means as The Good Daughter still made for a disturbing yet compelling read.

Karin Slaughter has created exceptionally complex characters, both sisters have their own demons that continue to haunt them, this novel is very much about the complexity of relationships and bad things happening to good people. Each character in The Good Daughter is garenteed to provoke a strong reactions, like anyone they have their strengths and weakness that make your own feelings towards each character sway constantly depending at what point you are in this throughly compelling read.

The author describes the small town of Pikeville so vividly it feels incredibly stifling, but also very typical, the kind of place where everyone knows you and your business, so it was intriguing to read how and why one sister choose to leave and the other one stayed, the reasons are complex but at the same time credible. Karen Slaughter never shies away from the darker side of life, in fact she hits it head on. The Good Daughter is dark, gritty and at times disturbing, with a superbly written plot, yet again the author has shown me why she continues to be one of my all time favourite authors on the planet.

Buying links:        Amazon UK 🇬🇧       Amazon US 🇺🇸

Print Length: 512 pages

Publisher: HarperCollins (13 July 2017)

Follow  the rest of the blog tour

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Final Girls by Riley Sager #BookReview

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Book description

Each girl survived an unthinkable horror. Now someone wants them dead…

They were the victims of separate massacres. Grouped together by the press, and dubbed the Final Girls, they are treated like something fresh out of a slasher movie.

When something terrible happens to Lisa, put-together Quincy and volatile Sam finally meet. Each one influences the other. Each one has dark secrets. And after the bloodstained fingers of the past reach into the present, each one will never be the same.

IMG_2298Final Girls is a compulsive read, with characters who are at once unreliable and sympathetic. Just when you think you’ve figured out the plot, the story pivots in a startling new direction. … A taut and original mystery that will keep you up late trying to figure out a final twist that you won’t see coming.”

If your looking for an “edge of your seat” thriller then look no further, Final Girls by Riley Sager will have you gripped from the first page, all the way to its nail biting conclusion. Final Girls tells the story of Three victims of separate massacres, they all have suffered similar experiences to those slasher movies most of us have watched, you know the ones I mean where one “Final Girl” is left in the closing scenes and manages to come out alive.

What follows is the story of two of the survivors Quincy and Sam, and that’s all I’m going to say about the plot as I would hate to give away spoilers. What drew me to this book in the first place was the author took the unusual step to focus on the survivors of the most awful crimes after the event, so this novel certainly makes for an original and compulsive read.

As you would expect both Quincy and Sam may have survived shocking and traumatic events but neither of them have come out unscathed, at the start they both seem pretty average until the author weaves her magic and you realise both characters are not only complex but also very damaged by their traumatic experiences and they seem untrustworthy, and for me that’s what made this novel such a compelling read.

With twist and turns galore it’s pretty much impossible to “second guess” where the author is leading the reader, but I certainly enjoyed every minute of this dark crime thriller. Full of mystery and suspense this novel certainly fray’s the nerves, as the tension and suspense reaches fever pitch before the final shocking scenes. Riley Sager without doubt has written a novel that makes for a tense and exhilarating read and if you are a fan of a well written crime thriller then this is one book you don’t want to miss.

Buying links:   Amazon UK 🇬🇧     Amazon US 🇺🇸

Hardcover: 352 pages

Publisher: Ebury Press (Fiction) (13 July 2017